Seasonal Flu Vaccination

2020 Flu Vaccination Programme

 

We have started our Flu Vaccination Programme.

Our flu clinics will run on specific days and some Saturdays in October in Dedworth Medical Centre and South Meadow Surgery.

Please be aware that you need to book an appointment to have your flu jab. We are not running any walk-in flu clinics this year.

All eligible patients have been called or texted to remind you to book an appointment. If you are eligible and have not been invited please call to book an appointment.

Current dates are;

  • Wednesday 7th October in the afternoon at Dedworth Medical Centre
  • Friday 9th October in the afternoon at South Meadow Surgery
  • Saturday 10th October in the morning at Dedworth Medical Centre

We are also running two additional clinics at Windsor Race Course on;

  • Wednesday 21st October 
  • Friday 23rd October

See below for information about drive through flu clinic at the race course.

More dates will be added to complete the vaccination programme.

 

Who is eligible for a FREE flu vaccination:

  • Anyone who is 65 years and over
  • Children and adults with underlying health conditions
  • Children and adults with weakened immune systems

This year because of Covid 19 the flu vaccine is also being offered to the additional cohorts:

  • Household contacts of those on the NHS Shielded Patient List
  • Health and social care workers employed through Direct Payment and/or Personal Health Budget

An additional cohort of adults 50-64 years will be eligible from the end of November, depending on the supply of vaccine.

If you have any queries regarding flu eligibility or if you do not wish to have a flu jab you can email the surgery at southmeadow.dedworth@nhs.net

 

What do you need to know before you attend the flu clinic:

  • Do not attend the clinic if you or a house hold member are feeling unwell (please make sure you let us know so we can offer your appointment to someone else)
  • Please ensure you are wearing a face covering
  • Please arrive on time to help reduce social gathering
  • Please wear loose clothing or short sleeves
  • We have planned carefully for a safe flow through the building. You will be asked to enter and exit through different doors (one way flow system)
  • If you are unable to attend please cancel before 6pm on the previous working day
  • We will be unable to deal with other medical problems when doing flu clinics

 

Flu Drive Through Patient Leaflet.docx

 

Should I get the Flu Vaccination?

Content Supplied by NHS Choices

For most people, flu is unpleasant but not serious. You will usually recover within a week.

However, certain people are at greater risk of developing serious complications of flu, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. These conditions may require hospital treatment.

The flu vaccine is offered free to people who are at risk, to protect them from catching flu and developing serious complications.

At-risk groups

It is recommended that you have a flu jab if you fall into one or more of the following categories:

  • are 65 years old or over (including those becoming age 65 years by 31 March 2018
  • all pregnant women (including those women who become pregnant during the flu  season)
  • all those aged two, three, and four years old (but not five years or older) on 1 September 2017
  • all school-aged children who are part of the pilot childhood programme
  • have a serious medical condition (see below)
  • are living in a long-stay residential care home or other long-stay care facility (not including prisons, young offender institutions or university halls of residence)
  • people who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or those who are the main carer of an older or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill
  • are a frontline health or social care worker (see below)

If you are the parent of a child who is over six months old and has a long-term condition on the list below, speak to your GP about the flu vaccine. Your child's condition may get worse if they catch flu.

Pregnant women

It is recommended that all pregnant women should have the flu vaccine, whatever stage of pregnancy they're in.

This is because there is good evidence that pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu, particularly from the H1N1 strain.

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine can be safely and effectively given during any trimester of pregnancy. The vaccine does not carry risks for either the mother or baby. In fact, studies have shown that mothers who have had the vaccine while pregnant pass some protection to their babies, which lasts for the first few months of their lives.

People with medical conditions

The flu vaccine is offered free to anyone who is over six months of age and has one of the following medical conditions:

If you live with someone who has a weakened immune system, you may also be able to have a flu vaccine. Speak to your GP about this.

Frontline health or social care workers

Employers are responsible for ensuring that arrangements are in place for frontline healthcare staff to have the flu vaccine.

Outbreaks of flu can occur in health and social care settings, and staff, patients and residents are at risk of infection.

Frontline health and social care staff should protect themselves by having the flu vaccine to prevent the spread of flu to colleagues and other members of the community.

If you care for someone who is elderly or disabled, speak to your GP about getting vaccinated against seasonal flu. You should also ensure that the person you care for has the flu jab.

Children

An annual nasal spray flu vaccine will be offered to all children aged two, three or four years on 1 September 2017 as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme.

It will also be offered to children aged 2-18 with long-term health conditions like diabetes, heart disease and lung disease.

Children aged six months to 2 years with long-term health conditions aren't able to have the nasal spray and will get the injected flu vaccine instead.


Who should not have the flu vaccination?

You should not have the flu vaccine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a flu vaccine or one of its ingredients. This happens very rarely.

Is this year's vaccine safe?

Content Supplied by NHS Choices

Although no medical procedure is totally free of risk, flu vaccines are generally very safe. The most common reaction to the jab is a sore arm, or you may feel hot for a day or two after the vaccination.

This year’s flu jabs have been tested and approved for use across the UK and in Europe. The jab cannot give you flu because it doesn't contain any active viruses.

The Department of Health recommends that everyone who is eligible for a flu jab should have it as soon as the vaccine is available.

If you are in an at-risk group and do not have the jab, you will have a greater risk of developing serious complications or even dying if you get flu this winter.

If you haven't had the flu vaccine and you are in a risk group, make an appointment to get vaccinated.

Find out more about the flu vaccine, including how the vaccine is made and how it protects you.

Flu vaccine for children

A annual nasal spray flu vaccine is now offered to all children aged two, three and four years as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme.

In certain geographic areas the spray will also be offered to children aged 2-18 with long-term health conditions like diabetes, heart disease and lung disease.  Please contact the surgery for further information if required.

Children aged six months to 2 years with long-term health conditions aren't able to have the nasal spray and will get the injected flu vaccine instead.

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